Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Smart Safety: US Swim School Association’s Guide to Surviving a Fall Through the Ice

It is never a good idea to walk onto a frozen lake without following the proper protocols and knowing how long it takes and what temperature must be hit for that body of water to freeze. Each year, it’s estimated that nearly 8,000 people die from drowning. Even though ice may appear safe, some areas can be thinner than others. Unfortunately, when venturing onto ice, not everyone has a friend nearby or carries an item such as an ice pick to help them out of the water. The United States Swim School Association, the leading swim school organization in the country, has created a list of what to do if you fall through ice.

Brace Yourself: This may be difficult to do at first but due to the immediate change in body temperature and shock from the cold water, the body’s immediate reaction is going to be to gasp for air and hyperventilate. Breathing in the freezing water increases the chances of drowning.

Keep Calm: Do not flail your arms; this will release more body heat. The body loses 32 times more heat in cold water than in cold air. Panicking will do nothing, keep your head above the water, grab onto the ice in the direction you came from. This ice should be strong enough to help you out of the water.

Do Not Undress Winter Clothes: Keep winter clothing on while in the water, it will not drag you down. It will help keep in body heat and any air inside the clothing will help you float.

Get Horizontal: Once you’ve gotten most of your upper body out of the water, kick your legs as strongly as possible in hopes of getting yourself out of the water and onto the ice.

Roll Onto The Ice: Do not stand up, roll over the ice once you’re out to help prevent more cracks in the ice and from falling in again. Always stay off ice that’s only 3 inches thick or less.

Retrace Your Steps: Once out and far enough away from the hole, trace your footsteps back to safety. Take it slow because your body is still dealing with the affects of the freezing water.

Throw, Don’t Go: Never enter the water to rescue someone. If someone is there to help you it is safer for that person to throw a lifesaving device, branch, coat, or rope into the water, wait until you grab hold and then tow you to safety. Otherwise you could both end up in the water.

Get Warm: Once out of the water seek medical attention to bring body temperature back to normal.

To find a USSSA affiliated swim school near you, or for details on becoming a member of the nation’s leading swim school organization visit:

About US Swim School Association
US Swim School Association (USSSA) began in 1988 to fill a gap in the swim school industry. USSSA has become the largest and preeminent swim school association in the country with over 400 members providing swim and water safety instruction to over 500,000 students each year. Swim schools receive invaluable benefits as USSSA members, receiving the latest training in water safety, swim instruction methods and tools, invitations to annual conferences, and many other benefits that help establish and build each individual business. USSSA has partnered with Safer 3 Water Safety Foundation for its official water safety program. Through USSSA, parents and students are provided with a reliable and trustworthy resource when searching for a swim school and can rest assured they have chosen a top school when they choose a USSSA affiliated location.

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